Helene Cixous and Poststructuralist Feminist Theory

Helene Cixous‘ work has been influenced by Derridean deconstruction. Essays such as The Laugh of the Medusa, Sorties, Coming to Writing and Other Essays (1991), Readings and The Newly Born Woman (with Catherine Clement, translation in 1986) are her attempts to discover a writing that is fluid, transgressive and beyond binary systems of logic. Cixous has also… Read More Helene Cixous and Poststructuralist Feminist Theory

Anglo-American and French Feminisms

The Feminist movement in America received great stimulus from the 1960s’ civil rights movement, and in Britain it has had a political orientation, insisting on situating both feminist concerns and literary texts within a material and ideological context. Thus Anglo-American feminism is inclined towards liberal humanistic tendencies of criticism, with its interests in traditional critical… Read More Anglo-American and French Feminisms

Ecriture Feminine

Introduced by Helene Cixous in her essay, The Laugh of the Medusa, ecriture feminine refers to a uniquely feminine style of writing characterised by disruptions in the text, such as gaps, silences, puns, new images and so on. It is eccentric, incomprehensible and inconsistent, and the difficulty to  understand it is attributed to centuries of… Read More Ecriture Feminine

The Feminist Dictum “the Personal is the Political”

A frequently heard feminist rallying cry, especially during the late 1960s and 1970s,  and a central doctrine of the second-wave feminists, who used its underlying meaning in their writings, speeches, consciousness-rising, and other other activities, the concept “the personal is the political’ is believed to have originated from Carol Hanisch‘s 1970 essay titled The personal is… Read More The Feminist Dictum “the Personal is the Political”

Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own

In her highly influential critical A Room of Ones Own (1929), Virginial Woolf studied the cultural, economical and educational disabilities within the patriarchal system that prevent women from realising their creative potential. With her imaginary character Judith (Shakespeare’s fictional sister), she illustrated that a woman with Shakespeare’s faculties would have been denied the opportunities that… Read More Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own

Feminism: An Essay

Feminism as a movement gained potential in the twentieth century, marking the culmination of two centuries’ struggle for cultural roles and socio-political rights — a struggle which first found its expression in Mary Wollstonecraft‘s Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792). The movement gained increasing prominence across three phases/waves — the first wave (political), the… Read More Feminism: An Essay