Psychoanalytic Reading of Kafka’s The Man Who Disappeared

Kafka’s first novel, The Man who Disappeared (Der Verschollene), still better known in the English-speaking world at least under Max Brod’s title, Amerika, is set against the realist backdrop of the most modern and technologically advanced society in the world, the USA. The America of this novel remains strangely hyper-real, however, in spite of Kafka’s… Read More Psychoanalytic Reading of Kafka’s The Man Who Disappeared

The Other, The Big Other, and Othering

Critical theorists are particularly committed to opposing binary oppositions where one side is seen as privileged over or defining itself against an Other (often capitalized), for example, male/female, Occident/Orient, center/margin. Through such binary oppositions, Homi Bhabha explains, “The Other loses its power to signify, to negate, to initiate its historic desire, to establish its own… Read More The Other, The Big Other, and Othering

 Lacan’s Concept of Mirror Stage

Lacan‘s reinterpretation of Freud, with the central focus on language, brought about a post-structuralist turn to psychoanalytic theory. In his paper titled Mirror Stage (1949), Lacan expounds the concept of the mirror stage that occurs between 6-18 months of a child’s development, when the child begins to draw rudimentary distinction between the self and the other, as it… Read More  Lacan’s Concept of Mirror Stage

Jacques Lacan’s Reinterpretation of Freud

Jacques Lacan, who is often referred to as the “French Freud” transposed Freudian concepts into the realm of Saussurean structural linguistics, focussing on the operations of the process of signification, instead of the human mind as such. Lacanian reading attempted to correct the flaws of Freudian theory, especially the privilege that it accords to the… Read More Jacques Lacan’s Reinterpretation of Freud