Psychoanalytic Reading of Kafka’s The Man Who Disappeared

Kafka’s first novel, The Man who Disappeared (Der Verschollene), still better known in the English-speaking world at least under Max Brod’s title, Amerika, is set against the realist backdrop of the most modern and technologically advanced society in the world, the USA. The America of this novel remains strangely hyper-real, however, in spite of Kafka’s… Read More Psychoanalytic Reading of Kafka’s The Man Who Disappeared

Sigmund Freud and the Trauma Theory

Although Sigmund Freud himself inaugurated this field of study, he subsequently abandoned it. Early in his career, he assumed that a history of sexual seduction in childhood was responsible for the neurotic symptoms he Feminist criticism and psychoanalysis  observed in his patients. Gradually, however, he moved away from a one-to-one formulation of the relationship of… Read More Sigmund Freud and the Trauma Theory

Lesbian Film Theory and Criticism

Theoretical approaches to the cinematic representation of lesbianism represent a particularly complex and fruitful area of feminist film study, as well as one filled with substantial debate. Issues arise, for instance, concerning the exact definition of a lesbian film as well as the relationship between lesbian films and those that focus on other forms of… Read More Lesbian Film Theory and Criticism

Key Theories of Lionel Trilling

A writer of significance in the history of American letters, even at the height of his fame Lionel Trilling (1905–1975) was considered ‘a critic without portfolio’. What this means for the contemporary reader, used to critical categories, theories and factional groups, is that a historical understanding of Trilling’s role is as necessary as an intellectual… Read More Key Theories of Lionel Trilling

Carl Jung’s Contribution to Psychoanalytic Theory

A philosopher, psychoanalyst and a disciple of Freud, CG Jung treated the human self as the totality of all psychic processes considering the Freudian concept of individual consciousness as incomplete and unnecessarily negative, Jung proposed a second and far deeper level of the unconscious, which he called collective unconsciousness.Shared by all individuals in a culture,… Read More Carl Jung’s Contribution to Psychoanalytic Theory

Jacques Lacan’s Reinterpretation of Freud

Jacques Lacan, who is often referred to as the “French Freud” transposed Freudian concepts into the realm of Saussurean structural linguistics, focussing on the operations of the process of signification, instead of the human mind as such. Lacanian reading attempted to correct the flaws of Freudian theory, especially the privilege that it accords to the… Read More Jacques Lacan’s Reinterpretation of Freud